Passage: A concert of note

. ONE note, to be exact. It was the New York premiere of the “Monotone-Silence Symphony.” Conceived by the late French artist Yves Klein (1928-1962), the symphony requires 70 musicians and singers to take turns hold a single sound for TWENTY minutes, followed by another twenty minutes of DEAD SILENCE. The piece was performed just once in Klein’s own lifetime, in Paris in 1960, accompanied by three nude models smearing themselves with Klein’s signature blue paint. New York art gallery owner Dominique Levy was the moving force behind this past week’s performance: “I thought that was the craziest and most unreasonable thing to ever do,” Levy said. “How can you expect people to even bear 20 minutes of one note and 20 minutes of silence? And then I was lucky enough to experience it approximately, I think, ten years ago. And it was a life-changing experience.” Life-changing enough that she organized the concert to coincide with an exhibition of Klein’s paintings and sculptures — most of them blue. “If you think about it, it’s one single tone,’ Levy said. “And he works in monochromatic color, one single color.” And so to Wednesday night’s performance in a Manhattan church (minus the distraction of the three nude models in blue). Together, the voices and instruments had a mesmerizing effect over time. To listen to Yves Klein’s “Monotone-Silence Symphony,” click on the audio player. Audio recording courtesy of Bill Siegmund, of Digital Island Studios, New York.

Si Robertson has a wife, and she is not happy, happy, happy

Few performers have reached the heights of EWF with their continued popularity for more than four decades. Experiencing these three talented musicians and singers perform together was memorable. Members of the band jumped and danced while they played their instruments. You may even describe this event as “a party.” Earth, Wind & Fire techniques individualize their music. Very few performers rise to the heights of Earth, Wind & Fire. There were certain popular songs the fans expected EWF to perform and the audience showed their appreciation when they did. When you look back on the music of the 70s and 80s, EWF stands out. EWF’s songs express so much emotion, their jubilant mood lifts the spirits and takes the audience on a musical ride. The audience does not just listen, they are encouraged to dance. Earth, Wind & Fire’s songs express so much emotion, their jubilant mood lifts our spirits and takes us on a musical ride! The name of the band referred to Maurice Whites astrological chart. White wanted to express his spiritual approach to music and felt music should transcend all categories for a universal appeal. Earth Wind & Fire founding members Bassist Verdine White, singer and percussionist Ralph Johnson and singer Phil Bailey promoted their newest CD Now, Then & Forever. The CD is a transition of classic hits, recent numbers and a look to the future all with their special sound. The Venetian Resort presents a line-up of entertainment. Resident production shows Rock of Ages and Smokey Robinsons Human Nature, Soul to Soul and more.

Concert review: Zac Brown shines in live setting

Not that Brown should be left out of criticism. Heas got his own style of shmaltz, specifically his biggest hit, Chicken Fried, right down to the verse about freedom and the flag, parked up against the one about beer and blue jeans. So heas not immune to the promptings of writing clichAs either. Then again, who isnat? Where Brown is miles above most of his country music peers is in the live concert, where you actually get the feeling youare not seeing a carefully choreographed show that doesnat change from city to city. These are regular guys in T-shirts, throwing riffs back and forth for the joy of it. The vibe is jam band, the sound is somewhere between southern rock and Jimmy Buffett, the song choice often unpredictable. The opening actually wasnat all that unpredictable; he started with the subtly reggae infused Jump Right In, establishing the son of Jimmy Buffett credentials heas been establishing over the years. From there he went straight into his version of a80s neo-traditional country with songs like As Sheas Walking Away and Ainat In No Hurry, solid, mid-tempo tunes that fit snugly into the current trend though far better. Whiskeyas Gone kicked the concert up a notch, amped-up bluegrass with fiddle player Jimmy De Martini taking over. From there the Brown bandas jam band tendencies started taking over, and any critical analysis would have to rest on a listeneras opinion of that genre. That theyare talented players is indisputable, and they have a fine sense of dynamics to boot.